Ontological relativity: and other essays by Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine: Philosophy of Science

Quine, Willard Van Orman: Philosophy of Science | …

is a multi-year project of the late Professor Frederic Cassidy - a close friend of Quine since high school days. All 5 volumes have been published and they are a wonderful source of information about the regional differences in English across the United States. This continuing monumental effort of research and documentation was a passion of Quine's. Memorial gifts to help continue the work may be made to / University of Wisconsin Foundation, 1848 University Avenue, P.O. Box 8860, Madison, WI 53708

Quine Ontological Relativity And Other Essays Pdf - …

Ontological relativity: and other essays pdf free

Willard Van Orman Quine Published Books have been compiled directly from copies of Quine's books and from the exhaustive bibliographies in The Philosophy of W. V. Quine (P. A. Schilpp, editor) and Essays on the Philosophy of W. V. Quine (R. W. Shahan and Chris Swoyer, editors). This page is maintained by ; please E-Mail recommended additions, or corrections to the webmaster:

Ontological relativity: and other essays by Willard Van Orman Quine

This bibliography includes all known essays, articles, and reviews written by W. V. Quine together with a major reprint citation if available. It is based upon the extensive bibliographies published by (Special Collections, Main Library, University of California, Irvine, CA ), The Philosophy of W. V. Quine (P. A. Schilpp, editor) and Essays on the Philosophy of W. V. Quine (R. W. Shahan and Chris Swoyer, editors).

Ontological Relativity And Other Essays By W V Quine


Ontological Relativity and Other Essays: W

What is this thought experiment supposed to show? Well, it can't be taken to show that global freezes are possible, because (at least theway the story has been told here) they are simply a stipulated detailof the story, and we can't show that something is possible merely by stipulating that it is the case in some possible world. What the thought experiment does seem to show, however, is that it is possiblefor rational beings to have at least some evidence for the existence of periods of empty time in their world. For we can describe the possible world of the thought experiment in a neutral way that specifies how things in the world appear to its denizens, without specifying whether the real freeze functions for Zones A, B, and C are the simpler ones described above that entail a global freeze every 30 years or the more complicated ones that do not have that entailment. And a possible world that appears this way to its inhabitants is surely a world in which those inhabitants have some reason to take seriously the possibility that there are periods of empty time in their world, that they know when those periods occur, and even that they know exactly how long the periods of empty time last.

Willard Van Orman Quine Published Books page by …

Meanwhile, In Zone B there is a similar freeze for one hour every 3 years, and in Zone C there is a freeze for one hour every 5 years. The inhabitants of this strange world quickly become aware of the local freezes, and they have no trouble calculating the “freezefunction” for each of the three zones. What's more, they also calculate that there is a global freeze — a period during whicheach one of the three zones undergoes a local freeze — exactly once every 30 years. Whenever a global freeze occurs, of course, no one is able to see any frozen objects or blacked-out zones, since everyone and everything is frozen at the same time. But the reddish glowing and the development of temporary force fields that precede each world-wide freeze are observable to everyone; and so the global freeze times come to be celebrated by “empty time parties” all over the world.

Includes links to other Willard Van Orman Quine ..

It looks as if the A Theorist must choose between two possible responses to the argument from relativity: (1) deny the theory of relativity, or (2) deny that the theory of relativity actually entails that there can be no such thing as absolute simultaneity. Option (1) has had its proponents (including Arthur Prior), but in general has not proven to be widely popular. This may be on account of the enormous respect philosophers typically have for leading theories in the empirical sciences. Option (2) seems like a promisingapproach for A Theorists, but A Theorists who opt for this line are faced with the task of giving some account of just what the theory ofrelativity does entail with respect to absolute simultaneity. (Perhaps it can be plausibly argued that while relativity entails that it is physically impossible to observe whether two events are absolutely simultaneous, the theory nevertheless has no bearing on whether there is such a phenomenon as absolute simultaneity.)