Sonnet 130 - Sample Essays - New York essay

However, Shakespeare’s unique Sonnet 130 is debatably more significant and insightful.

Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 - Term Paper

Moreover, in "Sonnet 130," Shakespeare, in fact, parodies Petrarch's style and thoughts as his storyteller describes his mistress, whose "eyes are in no way as the sun" (Shakespeare 1918).

Shakespeare’s speaker in “Sonnet 130” sees beyond form, almost to a fault....

Sonnet 130 Essay – Free Papers and Essays Examples

Write a complete essay. Identifying an overall theme for each poem(Sonnet 18 and Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare) Where do you see these themes expressed? Are the themes in the two poems similar or different ?

Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 ,“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun,” mocks the traditional Petrarchan sonnet.

The love object in Astrophil and Stella Sonnet 20 and Sonnet 130 by Shakespeare are very unlike, the former one fits all the conventional beauty and the latter one is opposite; the treatment of love is different as well, Sir Philip Sidney illustrate it in a violence way and Shakespeare describe it in a more co...

I am going to compare and contrast between “Sonnet 130”, by William Shakespeare and “The Harlem Dancer”, by Claude McKay.


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE SONNETS with text of each sonnet


And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
Sonnet 130
1st Quatrain - Q1 (lines 1-4)
The Response
Second Quatrain - Q2 (lines 5-8)
Assertion of Expertise
Third Quatrain - Q3 (lines 9-12)
Proclamation & Summary
A Starting Point
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
Your eyes are as beautiful as the sun;
Your lips are the deepest, coral red;
Your hair flows like golden threads of silk.
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
Your skin is a perfect, snowy white;
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
Couplet - lines 13-14
The Turn
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
Remember, this is a retort to someone else's description of their wife/girlfriend
As any she belied with false compare.
My mistress' eyes are as beautiful as the sun
And her lips as deep red as coral.
Her cheeks are red as roses;
And her breath smells of the finest perfumes.
She speaks like an angel singing
And she is a goddess to me.
It probably read: (abridged version)
here comes something
different
swearing on heaven!

An analysis of William Shakespeare’s Sonnet (130) Essay …

Comparatively between “Sonnet 130”, by William Shakespeare and “The Harlem Dancer”, by Claude McKay, they are English sonnets with fourteen lines or stanzas, and the rhyme scheme of ABABCDCDEFEFGG.