Raising the Driving Age 18 :: essays research papers

Statistics are one of the main contributors to the argument that the driving age should be raised.

Essays on The Driving Age Should Be Raised To 18 - Essay …

Strong restrictions on nighttime driving and teen passengers, as well as raising the licensing age, reduced rates of fatal crashes and insurance collision claims.
why would it cut the number of deaths?
why would it reduce obesity?
disadvantages of raising driving age
On the con side of raising the driving age to 18, although younger drivers have more accidents, a lot of that is due to inexperience and one still has to gain that experience whether they start driving at 16 or 21.
Being able to drive at 16 can really be helpful to parents especially with so many work.

And 34% of teens under the age of 18 have admitted to texting while driving.

Driving Age Should Be Raised To 18 Persuasive Free …

has been a prominent hypothesis that posited that behaviorally modern humans suddenly appeared. It was once considered an abrupt event that began about 50-40 kya, but as new archeological finds are amassed, as well as recent advances in genetic research and other areas, the story is familiar. Although on the geological timescale the event was abrupt, radical, and unprecedented in life’s history on Earth, the “ramping” period seems to have lasted longer than initially thought. A likelier story is that in East Africa, which conforms to a . inherited culture and tools from their ancestors and continued along the path of inventing more complex technologies and techniques, exploiting new biomes, and reaching new levels of cognition. There does not seem to be any or development that needs to invoke divine or extraterrestrial intervention to explain the appearance and rise of . Some migrated past their African homeland during the of 130 kya to 114 kya and brought along their technology. Although they may have disappeared and perhaps became Neanderthal prey, vestiges of their fate are probably yet to be discovered. They may have contributed to the biological and technological wealth of Eurasian humans and may have begun to drive vulnerable species to extinction with their new tools and techniques. However, Africa remained the crucible of primate biological and technological innovation, as it almost always had to that time. By 70-60 kya, isolated African humans reached a level of sophistication called behavioral modernity. Art was in evidence, needles made clothes and other sophisticated possessions, and they mastered language, which was probably a unique trait among land animals. They made tools of a sophistication far advanced over other humans, which probably included projectile weapons that radically changed the terms of engagement with prey animals, predators, and other humans.

Because of the high number of accidents among teens, studies show that raising the driving age will reduce teen accidents.

Habilines and australopithecines coexisted, and the went extinct about 2.0 mya. Robust australopiths survived to about 1.2 mya (, ), and habilines , so they overlapped the tenure of a species about which there is no doubt of its genus: , which first appeared about 2.0-1.8 mya, and the first fossils are dated to 1.8 mya. is the first human-line species whose members could pass for humans on a city street, if they dressed up and wore minor prosthetics on their heads and faces. had a protruding nose and was probably relatively hairless, the first of the human line to be that way. That was probably related to shedding heat in new, hot environments, as well as cooling its large brain (molecular data with head and body lice supports arguments that the human line became relatively hairless even before australopiths). There are great controversies about that overlap among those three distinct lines that might all have ancestral relationships. Oldowan culture was a multi-species one. There is plenty of speculation that the rise of and its successors caused the extinction of other hominids, driving them to extinction by competition, predation, warfare, or some combination of them. What is certain is that “competing” protohumans went extinct after coexisting with the human line for hundreds of thousands of years. The suspicion that evolving humans drove their cousins to extinction becomes more common as the timeline progresses toward today.

There will be more teenagers getting in trouble and more work for police officers to do if the driving age is raised.


Driving age increase to 18 and curfew ..

In Triassic seas, ammonoids recovered from the brink of extinction at the Permian’s end to live in their golden age while still periodically booming and busting. It took ten million years after the Permian’s end for reefs to begin to recover, and when they did, they were formed by , which evolved from their ghost ancestors. Stony corals also built today’s reefs. Bivalves dominated biomes in which brachiopods once flourished, and have yet to relinquish their dominance. Before the Permian extinction, about two-thirds of marine animals were immobile. That number dropped to half during the Triassic, ecosystems became far more diverse, and a marine “arms race” . Predators invented new shell cracking and piercing strategies, and prey had to adapt or go extinct. The few surviving and were driven to ecosystem margins, and the Jurassic and Cretaceous would see the appearance of shell-cracking and .

Essays on The Driving Age Should Not Be Raised To 18

The (c. 5.3 to 2.6 mya) began warmer than , but was the prelude to today’s ice age, as temperatures steadily declined. An epoch of less than three million years reflects human interest in the recent past. Geologically and climatically, there was little noteworthy about the Pliocene (although the was created then), although two related events made for one of the most interesting evolutionary events yet studied. South America kept moving northward, and the currents that once in the Tethyan heyday were finally closed. The gap between North America and South America began to close about 3.5 mya, and by 2.7 mya the current land bridge had developed. Around three mya, the began, when fauna from each continent could raft or swim to the other side. South America had been isolated for 60 million years and only received the stray migrant, such as rodents and New World monkeys. North America, however, received repeated invasions from Asia and had exchanges with Europe and Greenland. North America also had much more diverse biomes than South America's, even though it had nothing like the Amazon rainforest. The ending of South America’s isolation provided the closest thing to a controlled experiment that paleobiologists would ever have. South America's fauna was devastated, far worse than European and African fauna were when Asia finally connected with them. More than 80% of all South American mammalian families and genera existing before the Oligocene were extinct by the Pleistocene. Proboscideans continued their spectacular success after leaving Africa, and species inhabited the warm, moist Amazonian biome, as well as the Andean mountainous terrain and pampas. The also invaded and thrived as a mixed feeder, grazing or browsing as conditions permitted. In came cats, dogs, camels (which became the ), horses, pigs, rabbits, raccoons, squirrels, deer, bears, tapirs, and others. They displaced virtually all species inhabiting the same niches on the South American side. All large South American predators were driven to extinction, as well as almost all browsers and grazers of the grasslands. The South American animals that migrated northward and survived in North America were almost always those that inhabited niches that no North American animal did, such as monkeys, (which survived because of their claws), and their small cousins (which survived because of their armor), , and (which survived because of their quills). The opossum was nearly eradicated by North American competition but survived and is the only marsupial that made it to North America and exists today. One large-hoofed herbivore survived: the . The (it weighed one metric ton!) survived for a million years after the interchange. , that , also survived and migrated to North America and lasted about a million years before dying out. In general, North American mammals were , which resulted from evolutionary pressures that South America had less of, in its isolation. They were able to outrun and outthink their South American competitors. South American animals made it past South America, but none of them drove any northern indigenous species of note to extinction.