Death of a Salesman essays are academic essays for citation

Death of a Salesman is a play about the significance and value of the American dream of success....

Death of a Salesman Characters | GradeSaver

You're one of two assistants to the assistant aren't you?"

Another example is the way in which Willy led Biff to believe that he has a salesman for Oliver, which in the end left Biff bitterly disappointed.

He then won a Pulitzer Prize in 1949 for Death of a Salesman and became a very successful playwright of the 1940s and 1950s.

SparkNotes: Death of a Salesman: Character List

Wagner gradually got Willy out of the business, first he downgraded him to commission only so he only got paid if he made sales and when that failed as well he eventually just fired him....

His foolish pride, bad judgement and his disloyalty are also at fault for his tragic end and the fact that he did not die the death of a salesman.

In 1949, shortly after the play's premiere, Miller wrote a controversial essay about how Death of a Salesman was a true tragedy, only with common people rather than kings.

Arthur Miler’s “Death of a Salesman” portrays the shattered relationships hidden inside a fallacy of grandeur that a father has with his two sons.

Death of a Salesman Character Analysis

These and several other references throughout “Death of a Salesman” portray the troubled relationship between Willy and his two sons, Biff and Happy....

Character Analysis: Willy Loman from "Death of a Salesman"

His ambition was one of greatness, to work hard and to be a member of the firm; and if he could not succeed in this respect, that he should at least be well-liked and be able to sell until the day of his death: When his friends would flock from all over the country to pay their respects.

Critical Analysis-Death Of a Salesman

Willy Loman is the main character and protagonist of the play. He has been a traveling salesman, the lowest of positions, for the Wagner Company for thirty-four years. Never very successful in sales, Willy has earned a meager income and owns little. His refrigerator, his car, and his house are all old - used up and falling apart, much like Willy. Willy, however, is unable to face the truth about himself. He kids himself into believing that he is well liked by his customers in the New England territory and by the company, who is sure to give him a promotion or opportunity to make more income.